How Hot Is a Ghost Pepper? (Ghost Pepper Scoville Scale)

Ghost Pepper Scoville Scale

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There are many hot peppers in the world, but is ghost pepper one of them? How hot is a ghost pepper?

Yes, the ghost pepper is ferociously HOT! It sits prevalently among the top 10 hottest pepper in the world today, with a fearful Scoville scale of about 1,041,427 SHU. The ghost pepper is 417% hotter than your everyday-jalapeno pepper.

If you enjoy eating “super-HOT” chilies exploding in your mouth all at once, I doubt you can take on the Ghost pepper. This pepper is known for bringing the fiery from the deepest region of hell. So don’t try to be a hero. 

Besides, starting every day with a handful of these peppers could lead to dementia risk. But it is only the tip of the iceberg.

Keep reading as we will be answering some of the frequently asked questions concerning ghost pepper.

What Is Ghost Pepper?

How Hot Is a Ghost Pepper

The ghost pepper, also known as bhut jolokia, is a hybrid of Capsicum Chinense and Capsicum frutescens. 

It once held the Guinness World Records title of the world’s hottest chili pepper in 2007.

However, in 2011 it was superseded by the world’s most fearfully HOT pepper: the Trinidad Scorpion Butch T pepper and the Carolina Reaper in 2013. 

Ghost pepper was a star at its time due to the number of press releases it got. 

That ONLY exploded its popularity on YouTube and other social sites. And the eat- a-whole-Ghost-Peppers challenge couldn’t stop. Chiliheads were going nuts every day. 

Many still erroneously believe the Ghost Pepper is still the World’s Hottest Pepper, but it isn’t, as you can see from this list showing the hottest peppers in the world. 

Is Ghost Pepper Harmful?

The ghost pepper is a double-edged sword.

While it is a potentially dangerous vegetable low in fat and calorie, it has a staggering amount of vitamin C.

Even chili pepper enthusiasts exercise preventive measures even before taking a bite.

Eating a whopping amount of it could kill you. For instance, three pounds of Ghost peppers can terminate a person weighing about 150 pounds. 

But as long as you don’t eat 1/50th your body weight in ghost peppers, you’ll probably survive the burn.

Although you may come out bruised. 

So DO NOT be a fool! They might not be the world’s hottest pepper, but they are more than capable of bringing a grown man to his knees. 

What Are Ghost Peppers Used For?

Consuming ghost pepper in moderation can help ease abdominal pain, discomfort, and diarrhea. 

Strangely, the chemical in them (Capsaicin) also kills the bacteria responsible for causing stomach ulcers. And like every other chili, the Ghost pepper fires up your metabolism, which helps in weight loss. 

But that’s just the sugar side of it. 

The same compound that can miraculously cut down abdominal pains is also responsible for causing gastrointestinal irritation, resulting in stomach discomfort and diarrhea. 

Isn’t it ironic that the hero of the day turns out to be the serial killer at night? 

On top of that, inhaling the fumes may cause you to sneeze, cough, or have rhinitis. 

When Are Ghost Peppers In Season?

Summer is the most favorable season for rearing ghost peppers. 

They will happily bloom in full sun location and well-drained, organically rich, and fertile soil along with a pH of 6.0-6.8. 

I’ve seen many chiliheads conducting a soil test before planting the baby peppers to determine the pH and nutrient level of the soil. 

When the peppers grow from green to red or any other bright color, they are ready for harvest. 

Does Chili Cause Memory Loss?

YES! Scientists have proven that consuming too much chili peppers is linked to dementia risk. 

They discovered people who ate about 50 grams of these pepper every day had memory decline and poor cognition.

According to the University of South Australia and Qatar University, after conducting mountains of research, they discovered rapid cognitive decline among adults — age 55 and older — who consistently consumed these peppers every day. 

Conclusion

Lastly, you might be wondering. Why is it called the ghost pepper? 

Of course, there must be an underlining reason for that name. And it turns out there is. 

First, it is called initially “Bhut Jolokia.” And it comes from the North-East, especially in Manipur. The word “Bhut” springs from the people of Bhutias in India, meaning “Ghost.” The word was given after discovering the heat sneaks up on you after eating it. 

Everything seems okay at first; then it builds and builds and builds — it never really stops.

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