Beef Consomme Vs Au Jus (How Are They Different?)

Differences Between Beef Consomme and Au Jus

When you travel around the world, you will find different unique cuisines and dishes native to specific regions. You may have tasted some of them and looking forward to tasting the others too.

The truth, most of these cuisines are the same but are called different names in different countries or regions. For example, ham (cured meat) is typically called prosciutto in Italy, while in Spain, it’s generally called Jamon.

So, what about beef consomme vs Au Jus? Are they the same food with different names? Well, no, they’re not the same food.

A beef consommé is a rich broth with no impurities, and Au Jus is a French culinary term that interprets “With Juice.”

Let us look more into the similarities and differences between beef consomme and au jus.

What is Beef Consomme?

First of all, the word “Consomme” interprets as “Perfect” or “Complete” in French. So, is it safe to say the Beef Consomme is a concentrated beef broth? Well, here is a complete definition of beef consomme.

Consomme is generally accepted as a culinary term for purified stock or broth. Hence, a beef consomme is concentrated, refined, perfect, or clarified broth. It typically looks more evident than broth, with more ingredients to make it rich and thick.

A beef consomme is tastier and contains very little or no impurities. The base ingredients for making this a consomme include egg whites, ground beef, seasonings, and vegetables.

What is Au Jus?

Au Jus is also a French culinary term; it means “with juice.” It is a meat dish usually prepared or served with broth, made from fluids gotten from the meat while being cooked.

Most French people who prepare Au Jus do so to enhance the flavor of their dishes. Basically, the au jus sauce is the drippings from cooked meat or broth. Jus can be stored for a long time; however, this can affect the flavor.

What are the Differences Between Beef Consomme and Au Jus?

Honestly, culinarians have corrupted the use of the word “Au Jus.” Practically, this is an adjective – “with juice” and not a now. But almost everyone now uses it as a noun.

Well, the major difference between Au Jus and Beef Consomme is that the former is the “juice” dripping from cooked meat, while the latter is a perfect beef broth (in other words, a broth without impurities).

Also, beef consomme can be served as a food, but au jus is never served as a meal. However, some people have crafted recipes that make au jus appear more like a whole meal.

Similarities Between Beef Consomme and Au Jus

Beef Consomme Vs Au Jus

The main similarity between beef consomme and au jus is the involvement of beef broth. Depending on how you prepare your beef broth, you could see au jus coming out from the simmered meat.

What’s Better About Beef Consomme?

Anyone can take beef consomme as a whole meal and be satisfied. It contains various ingredients and is free of impurities. Beef consommes are healthy and can be further added to other recipes.

What’s Better About Au Jus?

Basically, in French cuisine, au jus improves the flavor of dishes and makes meats tastier. It is never a whole meal – you cannot go into a restaurant and order for “Au Jus.” However, you can request to have a meat dish with au jus.

Beef Consomme Vs Au Jus: Which Should You Take?

You can take the two at the same time. Yes, you could order for beef consomme and at the same time order of a meat dish with au jus. But, if you’re actually looking at au jus as a meal, then you’d be disappointed to know that it’s not a type of food.

More so, if you were looking at au jus as a substitute for beef consomme in a recipe, that won’t work. You could actually use beef broth to substitute consomme (or vice versa).

Au Jus Vs Beef Consomme: Summary and Key Points

  • Au jus is the “juice” dripping from cooked meat. It is a French culinary term that interprets as “with juice” in English.
  • Beef consomme is a whole meal you can take alone. It is a perfect/complete beef broth.
  • You can use au jus as a substitute for beef consomme, and vice versa.

You may also like the following the posts:

Scroll to Top